Tag Archives: 2016 Chateau La Tour de l’Eveque

Rosés For The Dock – 2017 Edition

28 Jun

When I’m up. I can’t get down! Can’t get down. Can’t get level. YKWIM?

Over the past many weeks, I’ve been recommending rosés at quite a pace. But, who wants to scroll through all those posts to find a perfect sip for the dock or before supper, or after a cool swim, or ……..well, you get it. So, this should serve as a refresher.

This week, I was asked by a friend why I liked rosé so much. I didn’t really have an answer at the ready. I hadn’t ever questioned my ‘friending’ of rosé. I mean do any of us ever do a deep dive into why we like say sea scallops, fennel anything, hashwi, kibbi nayii, Omran’s curry? Not really.

So, I took the question away, gave it my full attention (if you know me, you know that I have the attention span of a gnat) and I now have my answer.

It’s just sitting there waiting

First let me say that I think rosé brings all sorts of good stuff to your experience – moderate alcohol, food friendliness, beauty, and usually a sense of place. But, I think I like rosé because it’s refreshing. Sometimes, I want refreshing, period. Now, all the wine geeks out there will write below that Sancerre is refreshing. They’d be right. Oh yeah, and Assyrtiko is nothing if not refreshing. All sorts of chilled whites bring refreshment. There are even red wines that bring refreshment, as well – like something tart from Maremma, perhaps.

So, I’m not suggesting that other wines can’t ‘refresh’. Just that a cool to cold glass of rosé is next to godliness on the refreshment scale. And, without sacrificing depth and complexity. Another reason might be that it’s reasonably priced. My favourite pink costs only $26.95. My favourite red or white wine costs multiples of that. Shit, that’s scary actually now that I see it in print.

OK, just popped the cork on a bottle of rosé to get in the mood. And, yes, it’s really refreshing. The later points I’ll try to make in this post may suffer from the fog but that’s wine bloggin’, baby.

Here we go:

My recommendations will fall into two categories – Provence and the rest of the world. I won’t wax too long on each.

Provence (in no particular order)

2016 Château la Tour de l’Eveque #319392 $18.95 I’ve recommended this rosé almost every year. It’s a beaut. Strawberries, and cherries, crisp, with a depth that defies usual Provence offerings. Love, love, love it!

 

Now, there’s a so much good rosé that’s moderately inexpensive that it might look like you shouldn’t pay too much for a sip. But, the 2016 Caves d’Esclans Whispering Angel Rosé #325076 $26.95  is worth every penny. It carries a bigger citrus presence than most of the Provence pinks. Solid depth, breathless purity. OK, I made that breathless part up. But, it is pretty special. Confession: this is my favourite Provence rosé. FYI, it comes in a 1.5L edition suitable as a gift if you were coming to my dock.

Every year, every year, every year, I recommend the 2016 Carte Noir Rosé #319384 $18.95. I mean it’s different vintage each year but you get the point. This might carry the most sunshine of these Provence rosés. Bright, grapefruity sunlight. Mid-afternoon with fresh sliced tomatoes and herbs, avocados with drizzled olive oil, bread, and olives. An almost perfect combination improved immeasurably if you had bright sun and the reflection of the Mediterranean in your Wayfarers.

I won’t go on about the 2016 Miraval Rosé #342584 $22.95 (750 ml) #490870 $46.95 (1500 ml). It’s here if you want to read about it. A worthy addition to this list.

Want to save a few bucks. Question: why do they call them ‘bucks’? And no Googling – you have to impress with the fact that you already knew something for once. Anyway, the 2016 Henri Gaillard Rosé #450825 $16.95 will fit the bill. Or the Bill. This is full value – crisp, fruit lurking on the finish and, yes, refreshing. A real good example of Provence rosé.

Another great value Provence rosé is the 2016 Gassier Sables d’Azur #33621 $16.95. Professionally crafted. Brings the sunshine of the Còtes d’Azur to your mouth. Fresh and perhaps a bit deeper than you’d expect. Very nice afternoon food wine!

One last beauty from that special place – the 2015 Saint AIX Rosé #451906 $22.95 (750 ml) 2016 Saint AIX Rosé #490 904 $45.95. Another step up the weight ladder. Citrusy as well. Chill this one and serve with a light barbecue before the sun goes all the way down.

The rest of the world:

Let’s start locally. Malivoire makes two rosés – 2016 Vivant Rosé #498535 $19.95 and 2016 Ladybug Rosé #559088 $16.95. I like them both. But I prefer the Ladybug and I’ll tell you why. The Vivant is more sophisticated, subtle, and expensive than the Ladybug. I’m not two out of three of those qualities. The Ladybug is weightier, I believe a bit more food friendly and, yes, more refreshing. I get more feedback on people trying the Ladybug and loving it than almost any other recommendation.

Another local rosé that I recently tried was the 2016 Creekside Cabernet Rosé #48819 $14.95 . This was a bit of a surprise. Expecting a little sweetness, it was bone dry. Expecting stainless steel, I got a hint of oak or smokiness. Made from Cabernet Sauvignon, a somewhat atypical or non-traditional rosé grape. But then again Creekside doesn’t conform. Tart and ready for some food. Nice effort.

If it’s mid-afternoon and you’re wanting to top up the tank, pop the cork on the 2016 Brancaia Rosé #490953 $19.95. The only problem that you’ll have with this wine is that it will be gone too soon. A great wine for your introduction to chilled rosé. Classic weight, elegance.

And then there’s Tavel. Tavel is the red wine drinkers rosé. It ain’t Provence rosé. It’s so much more than a ‘summer sipper’, which BTW is a pretty pejorative term for wine as tasty as rosé. The 2016 Domaine des Carteresses Tavel #739474 $17.95, the 2016 Château d’Aquéria Tavel #319368 $21.95, the Domaine Maby Forcadière Tavel Rosé #701318 $17.95 all have the medium body and long finish associated with Tavel. And do yourself a favour – stash a couple down below for the cooler months. These wines can handle the winter and winter fare very nicely, thank you.

That’s it folks. I see that some of my annual favourites aren’t in stores yet. So, I will give you a heads up if/when they appear.

Cheers. I’m off to God’s country. Happy Canada Day (150) to my compatriots! And, Happy 4th to those folks in the US.

Bill

Aborted Crop Tour – The Rainbow Daily Slosh

26 May

I arrived at the lake this past weekend with a mighty thirst after battling the throngs straggling north from Toronto. And, the tradition is that as soon as you turn on to the cottage road, you have to open a beer. Yes, a brown rocket, a road pop, a traveller as we used to call them. It just seems like the right thing to do and I haven’t driven the car off the very narrow and hilly cottage road yet.

A trusted traveller from the past

But there was an issue – stop the truck, pop the back, rifle through the spring stock-up and pull out a warm beer. Oh yeah, and suffer the ubiquitous black flies as they gnaw on my all too too sullied flesh (not many wine blogs can weave in Hamlet, yeah?) ….. So this time, “To hell with tradition. No beer en route.”

One year, a friend and I popped into the mother ship in Washago to pick up some cold beer on our way in. We got it to the counter when I discovered that it wasn’t twist off but required a bottle opener. I said to my friend, “Wait, we won’t be able to open that in the car,” and my friend switched out the beer for a more accessible brand. The cashier looked at us and said, “You’re kidding, right? Because if you’re not, I shouldn’t sell this to you.” We assured her that we were just foolin’ around. But, lesson learned.

We arrived at the cottage, unpacked, made the bed, turned on the water pump, checked for squirrels (I hate squirrels), put the groceries (read: wine and liquor) away, and The Director headed down to the dock to catch a few rays. But what to have with dinner? It’s never too early to consider the implications of a great pairing or of a disastrous one. But suffice it to say, I wanted rosé regardless of food. And, it just so happened that I had brought up a bottle of the 2016 Whispering Angel #325076 $26.95. Reflect back on my ringing endorsement of this wine here. This is great rosé! I don’t kid around.

This week’s release (May 27) focuses on Southern Italy. This is in my sweet spot but I haven’t had any of the offerings, save the one below – so maybe after I’ve tried a few, I’ll let you know. Instead we are just going to have a wander around the rest of the world. Before I start, just a heads up that there are two rosés this week. Both are recommended each year – the 2016 Château La Tour de l’Évêque Rosé #319392 $18.95 and 2016 Gassier Sables d’Azur Rosé #033621 $16.95. These are both Côtes de Provence and available for the next few months usually. Great crisp summer rosés – nervy, fresh, dry. Can be paired with salads, light BBQ and great with fish or seafood. I enjoy the La Tour so much that I asked for a bottle for Christmas and, damn if I didn’t get one! Shout out to S & B.

Sardinia is included in the Southern Italy feature and an Essentials red is the 2014 Sella & Mosca Cannonau di Sardegna Riserva #425488 $14.95. Cannonau is Sardinian for Grenache, Garnacha. This is a rustic, gutsy wine – so, food is a must – maybe ribs, pork something or other. Its medium plus body, leathery finish and Garnacha fruit make it a solid value. It’s on sale now ($2 off) at the price above.

A 2010 Bordeaux can be a beaut. 2010 was the third or was it fourth “Vintage of The Century.” It’s hard to keep track of those expert self-promoters, Les Bordelaise. This week there’s a relatively cheap 2010 – Château Blaignan #416727 $21.95. This wine doesn’t need any more time down below although could withstand a couple more years, if you’re so inclined. It’s ready for pop and pour. Smooth, well balanced – perhaps a bit lighter than I was expecting. Bordeaux blend scents of cassis. Some oakiness dissipates after a swallow or two. Good value in Bordeaux.

I’m sounding a bit like a broken record because I’ve recommended the 2005 Balbas Reserva #085183 $21.95 a gazillion times. Sandalwood or cedar on the nose (I know there’s a difference there but I can’t tell), loads of warmth and structure still. Very youthful for a wine that’s already over 10 years old. Impress someone with this as a host(ess) gift.

While I was at the cottage, I popped the cork on a bottle of the 2014 Henry of Pelham Speck Family Reserve Baco Noir #461699 $24.95. This is a substantial wine. I’m not sure if any of you Ontarians out there can remember when the first few vintages of Malivoire’s Old Vines Foch came out. Oh, it almost made you giddy. It still kind of does for me. Well, this is in that class. A lesser known and modestly vinted grape masterfully delivered. Dates and jamminess. This has an almost port-like finish. Nuts and dark fruits. Henry of Pelham makes a decent entry level Baco Noir as well. But, once you’ve had this, you’re not going back there.

Let me know if you have any illegal traditions involving vacations. I can’t be the only one.

Cheers.

Bill

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